February 27, 2021

How to Teach Handwriting to Preschoolers


Handwriting is an important developmental activity for the kids. How to teach handwriting to preschoolers can be a challenge or a difficult task. However, it doesn't have to be. Your child's natural curiosity will guide you as you begin to explore the many ways that you can get your child to write and practice handwriting. Most of the time, you'll be able to find a method like use right pencils, use handwriting pages,” etc., that works just fine for your preschooler. Once you've found the way you like, stick with it!

How to Teach Handwriting to Preschoolers

How to Teach Handwriting to Preschoolers

  • When you teach handwriting to preschoolers, you must keep it simple. Firstly, few lessons should be designed to introduce basic sounds and letters. The more you can fit your studies into a shorter period, and the more effective your handwriting lessons will become. You don't want to spend so much time in the classroom, concentrating on a long list of tiresome words and phrases, that your child gets bored and begins asking for the mobile phone to call their friends. Stick with the basics.
  • You can also use handwriting exercises to teach your young ones about the sounds of different letters. These can be found online or in any book on children's handwriting. They can help your child get used to the feeling of writing and the sounds that go along with it. You mustn’t overdo this, however. It's far better to teach them a few basic strokes and have them build on that than to attempt to teach them everything at once!
  • Try to introduce handwriting into your child's studies. Let them pick out a piece of paper and write the word on it. You can then give them a short talk about what they've written. For example, if they've written the word "apple" on their paper, tell them how you can find out about apples. They can then ask you questions about this and other fruit, as well as what to do with different fruits.
  • When you are teaching your kid about handwriting, don't assume anything. Tell them how the letters look and leave them at that. If you start giving instructions, the child may think that you're trying to sell them something, so play it cool and be informative at the same time.
  • Once your child has started writing, it might be time to move on to other lessons. It's OK to use pencils and pens, but don't jump to full strokes and full words. You want to teach them to develop the correct stroke order and fluidity in their handwriting. But, don't get too carried away and try to teach them everything at once.
  • Trying to teach two subjects at once can be overwhelming and frustrating for both you and your child. Your child will likely become bored and discouraged with the two lessons at once and may decide that he or she doesn't want to continue. Instead, break the task up into manageable pieces so that your child has a little variety and opportunity to absorb the information at his or her own speed.
  • You don't have to stick to the same format when you teach handwriting to children. Your child might not be old enough or interested in learning from you at that point. So, if that's the case, pick up a different book and start providing a new direction for your child. Ask questions and do some experiments. Some parents find that playing with their children in the language and penmanship class is an enjoyable way to teach the basics.
  • You should also take your child to see the doctor when they start learning about handwriting. This is important because some children have difficulties with this area of development. You should regularly take your child to the doctor to make sure they're not dealing with any problems.
  • If you're teaching handwriting to preschoolers, don't give up. The process can be a fun and exciting one. Don't give up and assume that they're not going to catch on. If they don't, just go back to the drawing pad and try another day again. As long as you keep your cool, your efforts will pay off. Handwriting is vital to the education of our children, but it's never too early to begin.
  • Finally, consider buying books about teaching your child to be more organized and keep their handwriting in check. These books can provide you with a peek into how the minds of children work. The act of sorting items and taking things out of a pile can be very stressful for a child who can't relate it to anything else. By showing them how simple the process is, they will be more inclined to practice good organization and tidying up. Buying a book on organizational behavior is a good investment; you can find one that includes lessons on how to teach your child to write appropriately.

Avoid some mistakes while teaching handwriting 

Provide only one type of writing equipment

Your child can be bored with using the same type of pencil, pen. This may cause unwillingness toward writing in your kid.  You should provide various types of writing materials like pencils and color pens to make writing enjoyable to your kids. 

Only use pencil for handwriting practice

Using only a pencil for writing practice can reduce the curiosity or interest in your children. Let them use the markers, the crayons for handwriting practice and paint with colors. 

Ignoring fine motor skills

Some parents ignore fine motor skills for their children. But the truth is, fine motor skills have a significant effect on focus and attention, and these things are an essential part of handwriting skills. Also, it supports and strengthens the motor skills of a child.

You should not let your preschooler write only on a worksheet or handwriting pages.  Give them different surfaces like a whiteboard or blackboard, and small dry erase boards, etc. Let your child enjoy practicing handwriting with markers, colors, chalks, scissors, and glue. Thus you can teach handwriting to your preschooler with less effort. 

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